Circular Economy

Circular Economy

The Circular Economy, conceived at a global level in the 70s of the last century, is an economy designed to regenerate itself through the lower consumption of raw materials, more performing production processes and producing less waste: the latter a cost that can be transformed, then, in resource. A model, strategically One among the most strategical models to deal with global warming, fight against local air pollutants, land  and marine wastes and the protection of biodiversity,  using new technologies, digitization and existing techniques, potentially applicable on large scale.
Ellen MacArthur Foundation, one of the most active Associations in promoting the development model, highlights that there are two types of material flows in Circular Economy: the biological ones, able to be reintegrated in the biosphere, and the technical ones, destined to be revalorized without entering the biosphere.
A circle in which consumption must be able to generate not a useless waste, but a result that can be in turn reworked and can be included in the circle of production and consumption, without unnecessary wastes, according to a concept of economy based essentially on three pillars: general consumption reduction, recycling and reuse.
The benefits seem unquestionable: a joint research by Ellen McArthur Foundation and McKinsey for Business and Environment claims that Circular Economy can lead to an increase of seven percentage points of European GDP in fifteen years, with productivity growth of 3 % annual and total benefits in terms of production costs and use of European basic resources for 1.8 billion Euro / year by 2030, with an increase in employment.